Should Knicks fans be jealous of the cultures in Brooklyn and LA?

For most of the second half of the season, if you scrolled NBA Twitter or hit up one of the dozens of websites that cover the sport, odds are you’ve seen an article about the Nets or Clippers.

It probably touched on how these two franchises, neither of which had much business being in the playoffs this season, let along making noise once they got there, had developed two of the best cultures in the league. Yesterday, each had their first home game of the postseason on the same night, a fitting culmination to their shared success this year. They lost by a combined 43 points.

Is this a bitter piece of commentary from a petty, jealous Knicks fan? Well…maybe a little bit. But not really. Truth be told, I’d give anything to root for a team that so clearly “gets it,” which Brooklyn and LA obviously do. Fact is, every one of those articles is not only deserved, but warranted. The Nets and Clippers are the best stories this NBA season has had to offer. Neither should have won a game in either of these series, and they both did. They’ll probably each win again.

But last night was a good reminder that a pristine culture only gets you so far in a league that was, is, and always will be dominated by stars. It’s not clear that any of the Sixers big guns even like each other, but that didn’t prevent Ben Simmons and Tobias Harris from combining for 60 points on 32 shots. Kevin Durant may already have one foot out the door, but his 38 points counted all the same.

In the end, to win it all, you need talent to do it. Many champions have a strong culture too, but it’s no substitute for a game changer, or three.

What’s the point here? Simple: most of the media commentary we’ve seen regarding New York putting itself in position to acquire star players, either this July or soon thereafter, has been with a wink and a nod towards the fact that they aren’t a team like the Nets or Clippers, and likely never will be. This, frankly, is bullshit.

For one, the Knicks have seemed to improve their culture a great deal, but I’m not about to sit here and make that argument. If you’re reading this, you’ve probably seen how this team has fought this year, albeit feebly. It felt different than in years past, to me at least. Also, when culture does start to set in, it’s usually hard to see in year one, which this Knicks regime of Scott, Steve & Fiz is barely through.

Here’s the bigger point: What the Knicks have done in opening up $74 million in cap space in the same summer when so many of the NBA’s elite will enter free agency may reek of arrogance, but in a league where stars still move the needle more than anything else, their actions deserve respect. That’s doubly true given how the knock on this team for 20 years has been that they’ve continuously failed to put themselves in a position to take advantage of the fact that they play home games in the Mecca of Basketball. They’ve finally changed that. Yet, instead of the type of praise their crosstown rivals have received, it’s been more of the same derision. It’s annoying.

So you’ll forgive me for experiencing the slightest bit of schadenfreude as I watched last night’s games. The downtrodden can only take so much, after all.

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